De-Bunking Tea Party Myths: An Interview with Katrina Pierson – by Debbie Georgatos TexasGOPVote

by Debbie Georgatos of TexasGOPVote.Com

Over this past summer, I spent a week with a longtime friend who has always voted Democrat, and who volunteered early on in 2009 that she realized she made a big mistake voting for President Obama. While we normally do not discuss politics, I mentioned during our summer visit that while I am a still a conservative Republican, I also support the Tea Party. Her response (beside a look of shock and puzzlement) was “I don’t think we should talk about that….”.

Which leads to one of the points of the interview below.

Opponents of the Tea Party’s political message — of fiscal conservatism and adherence to the Constitution — mislead Americans by knowingly misrepresenting, muddying and distorting that message and the messengers. Democrats in Washington, D.C. and even in the great state of Texas have resorted to a time-tested strategy to fight the Tea Party’s message: they label the Tea Party “racist.” It is hard to think of a more terrifying label in American political life, which is why liberals who shudder to think of fiscal conservatism and adherence to the Constitution, resort to using this most toxic of verbal assaults. From a Democrat Texas State Representative, to Congressional Black Caucus spokesperson Maxine Waters, who said that the Tea Party can go straight to hell, to many others on the Left, the Tea Party’s critics hope to fight the group’s growing influence by branding them with one of their sure-fire lethal monikers. Most notably, such Tea Party criticism is rarely accompanied by informed, thoughtful analysis or proposals to counter the fundamental Tea Party message.

Enter Katrina Pierson, a Tea Party organizer who serves in leadership capacities in the local North Texas Tea Party, at the state level in Austin, and in Washington, D.C. A nationally recognized leader among the intentionally unstructured Tea Party movement, Katrina grew up in a family that relied on the redistribution of wealth system, which the Tea Party fights to change. She entered politics with a passion in 2009, largely due to President Obama’s entry into the national political scene. Katrina is hardly alone in her role as a black American who supports and is supported by the Tea Party. Just here in north Texas, Pastor Stephen Broden, a 2010 candidate for US Congress in a district south of the heart of the City of Dallas, and who is African-American, was and is among the most popular speakers in Tea Party circles, and he is not the only one.



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