Allen West “Labor Day in America today: Labor boss fat cats living high on the hog”

by Allen West

It’s the first Monday in September and for some it signifies the end of summer, start of school, and the last time to hit the community swimming pool and BBQ.

However, the day we celebrate today, Labor Day, is a creation of the labor movement and is dedicated to the social and economic achievements of American workers.

The first Labor Day holiday was celebrated on Tuesday, September 5, 1882, in New York City, in accordance with the plans of the Central Labor Union.

However, according to the U.S. Department of Labor official website on Labor Day, “The first governmental recognition came through municipal ordinances passed during 1885 and 1886. From these, a movement developed to secure state legislation. The first state bill was introduced into the New York legislature, but the first to become law was passed by Oregon on February 21, 1887. During the year four more states — Colorado, Massachusetts, New Jersey, and New York — created the Labor Day holiday by legislative enactment. By the end of the decade Connecticut, Nebraska, and Pennsylvania had followed suit. By 1894, 23 other states had adopted the holiday in honor of workers, and on June 28 of that year, Congress passed an act making the first Monday in September of each year a legal holiday in the District of Columbia and the territories.”

But today I ask you, what does Labor Day mean in America now?

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