Allen West “UPDATE: State Dept warning to US citizens; here’s what they’re NOT telling you” 

Leadership is about vision, and as George Santayana once quipped, “those who fail to learn from history, are doomed to repeat it.” ~ Allen West

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As Written By Allen B. West:

As we reported on Saturday, the U.S. State Department issued a warning for Americans in Turkey. Fox News says, “The U.S. issued a dire warning to its citizens Saturday about “credible threats” to tourist areas in Turkey on the same day Turkish authorities exploded a roadside bomb in Istanbul.

The emergency message from the U.S. Consulate urged Americans to exercise “extreme caution” in public squares and docks in Istanbul and the Mediterranean beach resort of Antalya. “The U.S. Mission in Turkey would like to inform U.S. citizens that there are credible threats to tourist areas, in particular to public squares and docks in Istanbul and Antalya,” U.S. officials said in the statement. “Please exercise extreme caution if you are in the vicinity of such areas.”

Turkey has been decimated by four suicide bombings this year.”

I’d like to have a succinct historical discussion about what has now come about in Turkey. It’s important to understand historical context in order to develop strategies to defeat the global Islamic jihad.

Islam’s historical trajectory all changed around 628 AD after the successful taking of Mecca by Mohammad at the Battle of the Trenches, when he ordered the beheadings of some 3,000 people. That success completed his goal of “payback” against the Banu Qurayza tribe that had ridiculed him about his “night ride to Jerusalem” forcing his migration — Al Hijra — to Medina. Subsequently, the corresponding verses of the Koran became more violent as Mohammad became a violent and bloodthirsty warlord, leading nearly 33 combat raids. After the consolidation of Mecca, Mohammad set his sights elsewhere, namely the Byzantine Empire. It was then that Mohammad sent his infamous letter to the Emperor Heraclius offering him what has become the traditional three options for infidels: conversion, subjugation, or death.

From that point on there was a dedicated and focused cause for the armies of Islam to conquer that place, then known as Byzantium…later to become Constantinople, home of the Eastern Holy Roman Empire. And so it was that the Ottoman Turks under the leadership of Mehmed II finally achieved that goal in 1453. The once great city was conquered, its inhabitants slaughtered and the name changed to Istanbul. The armies of Islam had been successful in crossing into Europe and taking the Iberian Peninsula, what we know as Spain in the 7th century. The “Moors” of North Africa changed the name of the region to Al Andalusia and if it were not for Charles “The Hammer” Martel and the Battle of Tours 732 AD, perhaps Europe would have had a very different culture — certainly not one that produced Charles Montesquieu for whom James Madison relied upon for the construction of our three branches of government.

And as we know in January, 1492, the final Muslim stronghold in Spain surrendered to the United Christian forces after the marriage of Isabella of Castille and Ferdinand of Aragon. The hopes of the Islamic Caliphate of Al Andalusia ended…but the hopes to restore it are still contemplated to this day.

When you understand the concept of Dar-al-Islam versus Dar-al- Harb, lands once conquered by Muslims are deemed always Muslim. Therefore, what happened in 1453 with the Fall of Constantinople heavily impacted history. The Ottoman Empire’s influence grew far and wide across the region, along with its barbarism. The Ottoman genocides and savagery against Christian minorities is monumental, and recognized by many except for this current Obama administration. Their slaughter of Armenians, Assyrians, and Kurds still haunt generations today.

And just as to the West, the……

FULL STORY CONTINUES HERE:

UPDATE: State Department warning to US citizens; here’s what they’re NOT telling you – Allen B. West – AllenBWest.com

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