Here Are The Things You Need To Know About The Solar Storm That Could Strike Earth This Week

A Solar storm of great magnitude and one that would hit Earth directly is nothing to be ignored. Our own personal Star does have to power to kill us under the right conditions. That is not to say that this latest warning by the Space Weather Prediction Center (SWPC) is a cry of doom. In fact, this storm is classified as a G1  (minor) geomagnetic storm. The watch for this storm has been posted for Tuesday and Wednesday. Here are the things that a storm like this can do to us. 

As Written and Reported By Jennifer Earl for Fox News:

solar storm — a disturbance in Earth’s magnetic field caused by changes in solar wind — is forecast to hit Earth this week, the Space Weather Prediction Center (SWPC) has warned.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) issued a G1 (minor) geomagnetic storm watch for Tuesday and Wednesday. The storm watch was issued “due to the arrival of a negative polarity coronal hole high speed stream,” SWPC explained in a post online Sunday.

C. Alex Young, associate director for science in the heliophysics science division at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center, wrote in a report published Monday that at least three “substantial” coronal holes — which demonstrate the Sun’s magnetic field is exposed — were observed in the Sun last week.


“These are areas of open magnetic field from which high speed solar wind rushes out into space,” Young explains. “This wind, if it interacts with [Earth’s] magnetosphere, can cause aurora to appear near the poles.”

Here’s what you need to know about solar storms — and how they can impact the Earth — before one potentially hits the planet…..

THERE IS EVEN MORE HERE KEEP READING:

Solar storm could strike Earth this week: What you need to know | Fox News

 

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