Here Is How To Stop The Next Sh** Storm From Coming Out of a WH Meeting

Thanks to Senator Dick Durbin and his Tales From The White House, we had had a continual $#it Storm in the media and in politics. This is one of those situations where you wished that somebody was recording the meeting. Then we would see if Durbin was telling the truth for once. There is a negative side to this concept as well. 

As Written and Reported By Jazz Shaw for Hot Air:

I think Allahpundit has provided enough coverage of sh*tholepalooza to allow us to skip the details here this weekend. But one of the President’s tweets providing his “kind of, sort of” denial of comments made during that meeting should open the door to a wider conversation. President Trump once again suggested that perhaps there should be tapes of all conversations inside the White House so we don’t get into all of these endless arguments about who said what to whom.

Time Magazine has a history of covering this topic and they were once again compelled to weigh in this week, suggesting that running a taping operation in and around the Oval Office might be more complicated than Trump thinks. Unfortunately, this advice is based on a couple of assumptions which could be easily eliminated. Also, the ancient history they refer to doesn’t really match up with the realities of 2018 and beyond.

But, as TIME reported last year when the President appeared to imply that there might be secret recordings of his meetings with former FBI director James Comey, there’s a good reason why such recordings (especially if they’re made in secret) are no longer the norm for U.S. Presidents.

You can read that piece or the one from last year having to do with the Comey conversations, but Time’s analysis all ….

KEEP READING THERE IS EVEN MORE HERE:

Easy call: Start taping every meeting in the White House – Hot Air Hot Air

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