There’s Something Not Right With The Story By The Women Who Were Lost At Sea for 5 Months

Nothing is as dramatic as a lost at sea story. That is doubly true when it comes to a happy ending. Two seafaring women left Hawaii for Tahiti in their vessel but had an engineering casualty. The engine died and they were left with sails only. They drifted for five and a half months before being rescued way off course. Now the Coast Guard has a few interesting observations. Read these: 

As Written By The AP and Reported on By the NY Post:

HONOLULU — The US Coast Guard said Monday that the two Hawaii women who were lost at sea for five months had an emergency beacon aboard their sailboat that was never activated.

Coast Guard spokesman Lt. Scott Carr told the Associated Press that their review of the incident and subsequent interviews with the survivors revealed that they had the Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacon (EPIRB) aboard but never turned it on.

When asked if the two had the radio beacon aboard, the women told the AP on Friday they had a number of other communications devices, but they didn’t mention the EPIRB.

The device communicates with satellites and sends locations to authorities within minutes of activation. It’s activated when it’s submerged in water or turned on manually.

During the post-incident debriefing by the Coast Guard, Jennifer Appel, who was on the sailboat with Tasha Fuiava, was asked if she had the emergency beacon on board. Appel replied she did, and that it was properly registered.

“We asked why during this course of time did they not activate the EPIRB. She had stated they never felt like they were truly in distress, like in a 24-hour period they were going to die,” said Coast Guard spokeswoman Petty Officer 2nd Class Tara Molle, who was on the call to the AP with Carr.

Carr also said the Coast Guard made radio contact with a vessel that identified itself as the Sea Nymph in June near Tahiti, and the captain said they were not in distress and expected to make land the next morning. That was after the women reportedly lost their engines and sustained damage to their rigging and mast……….

THERE’S MORE HERE KEEP READING:

Lost sailors’ story doesn’t add up, experts say | New York Post

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